Book Review: Tony and Susan

I had never heard of Austin Wright’s 1993 novel Tony and Susan until I saw the trailer for the Tom Ford film, Nocturnal Animals. Thoroughly intrigued by the preview, I soon discovered that Tom Ford’s most recent foray into cinema was inspired by the aforementioned novel. As I retain an irrational sense that I must…

Book Review: Palestine

In conjunction with my post on graphic novels as pedagogical tools, what follows is my review of the graphic novel Palestine by Joe Sacco, which I first read for my research paper. *** Personalizing the Occupation In an attempt to understand and convey to a wider audience the graphic realities of life under occupation, Joe Sacco’s…

Book Review: Waltz with Bashir

In conjunction with my post on graphic novels as pedagogical tools, what follows is my review of the graphic novel Waltz with Bashir, which I first read for my research paper. *** Addressing National Trauma through Personal Witnessing Waltz with Bashir, illustrated by David Polonsky, depicts writer Ari Folman’s struggle to remember the events of…

Book Review: Baddawi

In conjunction with my last post on graphic novels as pedagogical tools, what follows is my review of the graphic novel Baddawi, which I first read for my research paper. *** Leila Abdelrazaq’s Baddawi tells the story of Ahmad, a young Palestinian refugee growing up between the Baddawi refugee camp in northern Lebanon and Beirut…

The Loudness in Silence

Jesse Ball’s novel ‘Silence Once Begun” presents an interesting investigation of the lies and truths that are hidden in our silences.

In Moonlight Black Boys Look Blue

Through ‘Moonlight’ Barry Jenkins and Tarell Alvin McCraney present a touching portrait of a young man’s struggle to come to terms with his sexuality and identity.

Watching the Fireflies Dance into Oblivion

Review: Grave of the Fireflies (Film) After the American firebombing of Kobe, the village home to our protagonists, siblings Seita and Setsuko initially take refuge with relatives before setting out on their own to look after themselves in the countryside of wartime Japan. In the wake of the initial firebombing, teenaged Seita and young Setsuko find their mother…

The Heart Goes Last…Or First in My Case

Review: The Heart Goes Last by Margaret Atwood Margaret Atwood’s most recent foray into dystopian literature, a familiar genre for Ms. Atwood, The Heart Goes Last is an examination not only of the bleak prospects of economic collapse, but of the desperation with which humans will conform to arbitrary social norms for comfort. By the same…

Israel Unveiled

Originally posted on Two Roads Diverged:
A Review of Goliath by Max Blumenthal Goliath by Max Blumenthal Although the state would like the international public to believe it embodies the underdog “David” archetype from the “David and Goliath” trope, constantly under attack from a savage and massive enemy, in reality Israel’s state policies towards minorities and rampant racism…

Life or Death? I’ll Choose Death

On Reading Life and Death: Twilight Reimagined In a bout of nostalgia, and prompted by sheer boredom, I recently found myself re-reading Twilight. Well, that’s not exactly correct. After reading online that Stephenie Meyer had released a special tenth-anniversary edition of her debut novel, I decided “why the hell not.” This new edition comes with…

Book Review: number9dream by David Mitchell

After reading Cloud Atlas two years ago, David Mitchell immediately became one of my favorite writers. His natural ease for crafting a richly layered narrative was, and still is mesmerizing to me. I had wanted to read number9dream immediately following Cloud Atlas, particularly because of the experimental narrative style, but unfortunately, two years of college essays and unending reading…